Other Japanese Ship FAQs
 
Maru's & PSIS 100 Document
 
Posted By: Al Peters <dsr017@attglobal.net>
Date: Sunday, 26 November 2000, at 2:18 p.m.
 
I have a copy of "Pacific Stratgic Intelligence Section 100-1" date 1 Feb. 1945, 2nd Edition. It is a list of "Japanese Merchant Ships" of 50 tons or more which bear the suffix "Maru". It records data in the following format:
Japanese characters of the name of the vessel
Romaji Name (English name)
Int'l Call sign
Gross tons
Year laruched
Type and Number (japanese number)
Speed
Lgth, Beam, Draft
Construction of Hull
Sources (based on over 20 different sources)
Remarks (mainly as to fate)
I have entered this data into one of my databases and it topped out at 8512 individual records.
Question, does anyone who is famaliar with this document have an opionin as to the quality of this data.
 
Re: Maru's & PSIS 100 Document
 
Posted By: Tony Tully <atully@flash.net>
Date: Monday, 27 November 2000, at 2:55 p.m.
 
In Response To: Maru's & PSIS 100 Document (Al Peters)
 
Generally such wartime intelligence data was derived from either captured documents (such as a roster of Japanese officers that is very useful) or from intercepts arranged and studied. My bet is that it is the former here. Usually, such are fairly reliable and primary source in origin, but you have to beware of false readings of the kanji. Sometimes the rendering given is not the right one, but you can match up details to confirm most of them.
 
Re: Maru's & PSIS 100 Document
 
Posted By: Al Peters <dsr017@attglobal.net>
Date: Monday, 27 November 2000, at 5:32 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Maru's & PSIS 100 Document (Tony Tully)
 
Tony, Thanks for your response ... the sourse documents are a mix of what you have pointed out ... such sourses as from 1940-42 Lloyds, Japanese Commence Minsitry to captured Japanese Navy/Army documents.
PSIS100, was received on 35mm mircofilm ... I have an old mircofilm printer, so I printed it out ... it's a big document running some 600+ pages .... unfortunately, since it's entry in the my databases I have not been able to do much analysis.
I understand your concern regarding Kanji vs Romaji ... but I don't read Japanese, so can only do "match ups" on a vessel's phyical data .... Maybe in the future time will allow me to make a good analysis.
 
Help wanted on "Maru" ships!
 
Posted By: Elephtheriou George <elgeorge@otenet.gr>
Date: Saturday, 18 November 2000, at 2:48 p.m.
 
Normaly I wouldn't visit you since I'm mostly in the A/C. But lately, I've been given the quite hard task to translate a Japanese document, in which ship's names are mentioned. I have the "Imperial J. Navy" by Watts/Gordon book but could find no information there about the following ships:
Tateyama (Tachiyama?) Maru
Mikage Maru
Fujikawa Maru
Kikukawa Maru
Ogashima Maru
Kenbu Maru
Shiganoura Maru
Ikuta Maru
Kanryu Maru
Please note that the above names might not be 100% correct, since reading of Japanese Kanji is sometimes tricky. But I'm very sure that these ships don't exist in the above mentioned book.
Any information (especialy type) would be EXTREMELY appreciated.
 
Re: "Maru" ships
 
Posted By: Yutaka Iwasaki <navy_yard-iwa@mbj.sphere.ne.jp>
Date: Saturday, 25 November 2000, at 2:28 a.m.
 
In Response To: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! (Elephtheriou George)
 
There are some phtos on the web.
"Mikage Maru 20"
http://www1.linkclub.or.jp/~ichi/sbs/Senbotsu3FILE/mikage20.html
"Mikage Maru 18"
http://www1.linkclub.or.jp/~ichi/sbs/Senbotsu3FILE/mikage18.html
"Kikukawa Maru"
http://www1.linkclub.or.jp/~ichi/sbs/Senbotsu2FILE/kikukawa.html
"Ogashima Maru"
http://www1.linkclub.or.jp/~ichi/sbs/Senbotsu2FILE/ogasima.html
"Shiganoura Maru"
http://www1.linkclub.or.jp/~ichi/sbs/Senbotsu1FILE/siganoura.html
"Ikuta Maru"
http://www1.linkclub.or.jp/~ichi/sbs/Senbotsu1FILE/ikuta.html
"Kenryu Maru"
http://www1.linkclub.or.jp/~ichi/sbs/Senbotsu2FILE/kanryuu.html
According to these pages
"Mikage Maru 20" 2,718 GRT lost 18 Jul 43 Kwajalein to Wake (SS172 PORPOISE)
owner:MUKO-KISEN
"Kikukawa Maru" 3,833 GRT lost 7 Oct 43 Truck (Fire incident)
owner:TOYO-KAIUN(shipping co. )@
"Shiganoura Maru" 3,512 GRT lost 29 Nov 43 WNW of saipan 18.24N-139.41E (SS264 PARGO)
owner:MITSUBISHI-KISEN
"Kenryu Maru" 4,575 GRT lost 29 Nov 43 Yokosuka - truk. North West of Hachijyo Is. 33.16N-139.35E (SS-185 SNAPPER)
owner:INUI-KISEN
"Tateyama Maru" 3,787 GRT lost 5 Dec 43 Kwajalein (air attack)
owner:BABA-KISEN(steam shipping co. )
"Kenbu Maru"@ 6,816 GRT lost 05 Dec 43 Roi N09.00-E166.30 (air attack)
Captured ship
"Ikuta Maru" 2,968 GRT lost 12 Jan 44 Kwajalein (air attack)
owner:NIHON-YUSEN
"Ogashima Maru" 1,424 GRT lost 20 Jan 44 150km South East of Yap Gurtz? Is.i08.07N-137.38Ej(air attack)
owner:NAKAGAWA-KISEN
"Fujikawa Maru" 6,938 GRT lost 17 Feb 1944 Truk atoll (air attack)
owner:TOYO-KAIUN(shipping co. )@
"Mikage Maru 18" 4,319 GRT lost 10 May 44 Guam to Yap (SS236 SILVERSIDES)
owner:MUKO-KISEN
And according to The Official Chronology
http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/USN-Chron/USN-Chron-1943.html
http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/USN-Chron/USN-Chron-1944.html
10 June, Thu. 1943
Submarine Flying Fish (SS-229) unsuccessfully attacks Japanese cargo vessel "Fujikawa Maru", 2455'N, 14536'E.
19 July, Mon. 1943
Submarine Porpoise (SS-172) sinks Japanese transport "No.20 Mikage Maru" 50 miles south of Wake Island, 1845'N, 16604'E;
29 September, Wed. 1943
Submarine Gudgeon (SS-212) damages Japanese gunboat Santo Maru off Saipan, 1528'N, 14557'E. Transport "Kenryu Maru" tows the gunboat into Saipan.
12 September, Sun. 1943
Submarine Permit (SS-178) damages Japanese aircraft transport "Fujikawa Maru", 0823'N, 16512'E.
29 November, Mon 1943
Submarines Pargo (SS-264) and Snook (SS-279) continue attacks against Japanese transport convoy northwest of the Marianas;
Pargo torpedoes and sinks Manju Maru, 1836'N, 14004'E;
Snook torpedoes and sinks "Shiganoura Maru", 1838'N, 13935'E.
Destroyer Oite and auxiliary submarine chaser Choan Maru counterattack to no avail.
Submarine Snapper (SS-185) sinks Japanese transport "Kenryu Maru" off Hachijo Jima, 3316'N, 13935'E
4 December, Sat. 1943
TF 50 (Rear Admiral Charles A. Pownall) attacks Japanese installations on Kwajalein and Wotje Atolls, Marshalls.
Planes from Lexington (CV-16) and small carrier Independence (CVL 22) sink
collier Asakaze Maru, cargo ship "Tateyama Maru",
auxiliary submarine chaser No.7 Takunan Maru, and guardboat No.5 Mikuni Maru
and damage light cruisers Nagara and Isuzu, stores ship Kinezaki,
auxiliary vessel "Fujikawa Maru", and transports Eiko Maru,
"Kenbu Maru", and "No.18 Mikage Maru".
12 January, Wed. 1944
PB4Ys (VB 108 and VB 109) bomb Japanese shipping in Kwajalein lagoon,
sinking gunboat "Ikuta Maru", 0842'N, 16744'E.
20 January, Thu. 1944
USAAF B-25s sink transport "Ogashima Maru" at Namu Atoll, Marshalls, 0807'N, 16800'E.
17 February, Thu 1944
TF 58 planes sink Japanese destroyer Oite (carrying survivors of light cruiser Agano sunk the day before), 0740'N, 15145'E;
destroyer Tachikaze, 0740'N, 15155'E;
armed merchant cruiser Akagi Maru, 0754'N, 15125'E;
auxiliary submarine depot ship Heian Maru;
aircraft transport "Fujikawa Maru";
10 May, Wed. 1944
Submarine Silversides (SS-236) attacks Japanese convoy about 120 miles south-southwest of Guam,
sinking auxiliary cable ship Okinawa Maru, gunboat No.2 Choan Maru,
and collier "No.18 Mikage Maru", 1126'N, 14346'E
Sorry long post message
 
Re: "Maru" ships
 
Posted By: Tom Hall <hall023038@aol.com>
Date: Monday, 20 November 2000, at 3:38 p.m.
 
In Response To: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! (Elephtheriou George)
 
Tateyama Maru is listed as an "aviation
transport".
There were a number of Mikage Marus,
Numbers 3, 18, and 20. Number 18 was a
coal ship, but 3 and 20 were transports.
Fujikawa Maru was an aircraft transport.
Obscure ships like these are listed in
Jentschura, Jung & Mickel.
 
Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships!
 
Posted By: Ron Wolford <wolifieeod@aol.com>
Date: Monday, 20 November 2000, at 6:57 a.m.
 
In Response To: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! (Elephtheriou George)
 
I have a copy of ONI-208J Japanese Merchant Ship ID Manual if you give me a couple of days I can get you a lot more info on some of these ships (builders, owners, size ect.)If you need any speical info please let me know.
 
Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! #2
 
Posted By: Larry Evans <Lae519@aol.com>
Date: Saturday, 18 November 2000, at 11:52 p.m.
 
In Response To: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! (Elephtheriou George)
 
Just checked the "Miscellaneous Mercantile Auxiliary Vessels" section, came up with the following hits:
Mikage Maru - 3 listing - No.3 ex Mifane Maru - Transport
No.18 - Collier
No.20 - Transport
Fujikawa Maru - Aircraft transport
Kikukawa Maru - Transport
Ogashima Maru - Transport
Shiganoura Maru - Transport
Ikuta Maru - Gunboat
There is also a listing of the fates of these ships, way to much info for this forum, Email me off line if you want/need more info.
 
Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! #2
 
Posted By: John Bullock <Johntqx@aol.com>
Date: Tuesday, 21 November 2000, at 1:53 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! #2 (Larry Evans)
 
On Nov> 14th 1944 The Navy closed off an area around the Bonin islands to all friendly forces making it a blind bombing area, Any shipping inn this area would be considered enemy. this was for 1 day only. I was a copilot in a PB4Y out of Tinian when our radar showed a target 100 miles south and west of Chichi Jima. The Navy wanted to try out our new low altitude bombing gear in combat.It was 1150 PM when we started our bombing run at 300 feet. At 0012 AM our bombs left the racks and made a direct hit on this ship. It was 4miles outside the harbor of Chichi Jima. Ass wwe passed over this ship it fired a salvo from a twin turret that was elevated 75 to 80 degrees, The projectals didnot explode as anti aircraft shells do. The shells were large like 5 inch or better. For over 50 years i have been trying to find out what kind of ship in was It went down in 1-1/2 minutes. I gotlist af the Japanese Aircraft carriers Crusiers, Destroyers and subs that were sunk and there dates annd location where they were sunk and nothing matched. I have had a computer for only 3 months and have tried to find the right buttons to push to get the right answers. Can you give me any help?
 
Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! #2
 
Posted By: Frido Kip <frido.kip@hetnet.nl>
Date: Wednesday, 22 November 2000, at 11:42 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! #2 (John Bullock)
 
How sure are you about the date? The Japanese fast transport T 4 was lost on 4 August 1944 off Chichijima by air attack. It had a twin 5in/40 HA gun on the forecastle. I was unable to find any other Japanese warship that was sunk on this date and in this area. Of course, the reported sinking date couls also be wrong but it was stated in Jentschura and in Watts & Gordon.
 
Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! #2
 
Posted By: Tony Tully <atully@flash.net>
Date: Monday, 27 November 2000, at 3:08 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! #2 (Frido Kip)
 
Good suggestion. Another longshot if the month is off and the date right is the big tender Jingei, which seems to have been lost in that area (or was it Formosa? I forget)
 
Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! #2
 
Posted By: Bob <Bob5@home.com>
Date: Monday, 27 November 2000, at 4:18 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! #2 (Tony Tully)
 
JINGEI was attacked and sunk on 10 October 1944 by Task Force 38 aircraft in the Nansei Shoto at 26-39N,127-52E. That seems a little early and too far west
 
Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! #2
 
Posted By: Tony Tully <atully@flash.net>
Date: Wednesday, 29 November 2000, at 4:23 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! #2 (Bob)
 
Agreed --- but I have not seen good description of her sinking, and was allowing for the possibility that 
maybe it was off. There is a curious lack there for such a large vessel, and I was struck by the description given.
 
Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! #2
 
Posted By: Frido Kip <frido.kip@hetnet.nl>
Date: Sunday, 19 November 2000, at 1:52 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! #2 (Larry Evans)
 
This is a vague question. First the Japanese used the same name for more than one ship adding numbers to differentiate, but not always. Then there were Navy requisitions, Army requisitions and civil shipping.
I found the same ships as Larry in Lacroix' Navy requisitions list (I do not have the others), but these would not necessarily be the same as the ones mentioned in your text. If you can give any background details this would be a great asset in the search.
Mikage Maru 18 coal tender 4,319 GRT lost 10 May 44
Mikage Maru 3 transport 3,111 GRT lost 13 Jul 42
Mikage Maru 20 transport 2,718 GRT lost 18 Jul 43
Kikukawa Maru transport 3,833 GRT lost 7 Oct 43
Ogashima Maru transport 1,424 GRT lost 20 Jan 44
Shiganoura Maru transport 3,512 GRT lost 30 Nov 43
Ikuta Maru gunboat 2,968 GRT lost 12 Jan 44
 
Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! #2
 
Posted By: Frido Kip <frido.kip@hetnet.nl>
Date: Sunday, 19 November 2000, at 2:04 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! #2 (Frido Kip)
 
Sorry, forgot three:
Tateyama Maru water carrier 3,787 GRT lost 5 Dec 43
Tateyama Maru transport 1,990 GRT lost 15 Feb 43
Kenryu Maru transport 4,575 GRT lost 29 Nov 43
 
Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! #2
 
Posted By: Elephtheriou George <elgeorge@otenet.gr>
Date: Sunday, 19 November 2000, at 8:38 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! #2 (Frido Kip)
 
thank you for the information. Unfortunately I don't have anything else on these ships, except their name, dates and roughly estimated position at a certain time. They are definetely WW2.
I'm only doing the translation on the document and I don't have authorisation yet to tell it's nature in public. Sorry about that. But both your information and those provided by Mr. Evans are very important. I really hope to provide you both with more on the subject. Until then, thank you again for the effort and your time.
 
Re: Help wanted on "Maru" ships!
 
Posted By: Larry Evans <Lae519@aol.com>
Date: Saturday, 18 November 2000, at 11:32 p.m.
 
In Response To: Help wanted on "Maru" ships! (Elephtheriou George)
 
Found a couple of your ships in Warships of the IJN, by Jentschura.
Tateyama Maru - 1940 - Aviation Transport
Kikukawa Maru - 1892 - Gunboat - was merchant steamer
Ogashima Maru - 1941 - Cable Layer
Ikuta Maru - 1936 - Gunboat
There are 3 listing for a Fuji Maru
Thats all I could find in the index. Hope this helps
 
Japanese Naval Vessels at the End of WW2, by Shizu
 
Posted By: Fred Carbon <fcarbon@sundyne.com>
Date: Wednesday, 25 October 2000, at 8:58 a.m.
 
I rcently saw on the board the above reference.Can somebody tell me if Ise/Hyuga are reviewed in this book.If yes, how many pages are dedicated on the topic (drawing, pictures ...)
 
Re: Japanese Naval Vessels at the End of WW2, by S
 
Posted By: Frido Kip <frido.kip@hetnet.nl>
Date: Wednesday, 25 October 2000, at 10:53 a.m.
 
In Response To: Japanese Naval Vessels at the End of WW2, by Shizu (Fred Carbon)
 
You may be surprised but this is not an in depth reference source! Instead it's a compilation of small handwritten pages with sketches of all warships that were left after the surrender to aid American authorities. Although it's interesting because it identifies virtually every IJN vessel still afloat (or salvagable) with it's last armament layout etc it is not what I think you are hoping for. Ise/Hyga cover only half a page and a few pictures. Nonetheless I like the book very much as I learned a lot from it, especially in regard to little known ships such as oil supply ships etc.
 
Re: Japanese Naval Vessels at the End of WW2, by S
 
Posted By: Tony Tully <atully@flash.net>
Date: Wednesday, 25 October 2000, at 1:30 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Japanese Naval Vessels at the End of WW2, by S (Frido Kip)
 
What are you looking for on Ise & Hyuga? I cover them extensively in the Inland Sea bombing chapter of my book. As for Shizuo Fukui's book, if memory serves, you get two pictures of Hyuga bottomed off a small island, and one of Ise bottomed leaning to starboard. The text doesn't have much detail. However, if you want a treat, dig up a copy of "Campaigns of the Pacific War" --- it has a whole segment on the Kure wrecks and attack, but has to be checked against Japanese sources, which I did.
 
Re: Japanese Naval Vessels at the End of WW2, by S
 
Posted By: Fred Carbon <fcarbon@sundyne.com>
Date: Thursday, 26 October 2000, at 3:48 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Japanese Naval Vessels at the End of WW2, by S (Tony Tully)
 
excuse my ignorance about your book(I am a new comer to IJN). It is very difficult to find something on this topic in Europe.
I gather all documents about these 2 ships (from technical to historical point of view) as hybrid.
Can I send you my file about all docs in my hands? In order to tell what is missing or in that direction to search.
Is there any document about their dismandling after the war.I recently saw a pic of Tone during its demolition and wonder if the same exist for Ise.
 
Re: Japanese Naval Vessels at the End of WW2, by S
 
Posted By: Frido Kip <frido.kip@hetnet.nl>
Date: Friday, 27 October 2000, at 11:37 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Japanese Naval Vessels at the End of WW2, by S (Fred Carbon)
 
If you like you can send your file also to me and I will see if I can point you to some unknown territory, if one is still left... Must agree that information on the carrier-battleships is scarse.
 
Re: Japanese Naval Vessels at the End of WW2, by S
 
Posted By: Tony Tully <atully@flash.net>
Date: Thursday, 26 October 2000, at 10:10 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Japanese Naval Vessels at the End of WW2, by S (Fred Carbon)
 
I am afraid your "ignorance" on my book is understandable. Its an unpublished manuscript still. It exists only in my home! Someday...
 
How many ships left?
 
Posted By: Jeff McGuire <jmguire@j-aircraft.com>
Date: Friday, 6 October 2000, at 10:27 p.m.
 
I just finished "The Kamikazes" by Edwin P. Hoyt and have a question. In describing Operation Ten-Go, he stated that the last of the IJN surface fleet headed for Okinawa. The tiny force included the Yamato, eight destroyers and a light cruiser. In this operation all were sunk but four of the destroyers. I thought that I had read somewhere that the Junyo and a few other carriers had survived, does anyone have anything on a list of IJN ships that survived and where they were at the end of hostilities? Are carriers considered surface fleet?
 
Re: How many ships left?
 
Posted By: Allan Parry <dparry02@cableinet.co.uk>
Date: Saturday, 14 October 2000, at 4:27 a.m.
 
In Response To: How many ships left? (Jeff McGuire)
 
I'm sure by now you have the list, but just in case... I can list the 'surviving' carriers:
Still floating:- Junyo, Ryuho, Katsuragi and Hosho
Aground in shallow water:- Kaiyo and Amagi
Other IJN carriers unfinished: Ibuki, Aso, Ikoma and Kasagi.
A few damaged IJA carriers were also scrapped after the war.
 
Re: How many ships left?
 
Posted By: Allan Alsleben <Wildcat42@AOL.com>
Date: Saturday, 7 October 2000, at 10:01 p.m.
 
In Response To: How many ships left? (Jeff McGuire)
 
The "Yamato Sortie" was the last "Offensive" Sortie by the IJN from Japan. They had just enough fuel to reach Okinawa, but not return. Junyo was in a damaged state and never repaired, as was many others. If you wish a list of combatant ships that survived the war, contact me off-line and I'll provide you with a list down to the deatroyer level. Or obtain Walls and Gordon's book on the "IJN of World War 2" or "Warships of the Imperial Japanese Navy" These books are easy to read and very imformative.
 
Re: How many ships left?
 
Posted By: Jon Parshall <jonp@combinedfleet.com>
Date: Friday, 13 October 2000, at 10:50 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: How many ships left? (Allan Alsleben)
 
Just a nit, but it turns out that in fact the Yamato, at least, had enough fuel for a return leg as well. That one-way trip thing is a myth
 
Re: Yamato fuel
 
Posted By: Richard Wolff <rrwolff@bpa.gov>
Date: Monday, 16 October 2000, at 11:47 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: How many ships left? (Jon Parshall)
 
Ah, but what kind of fuel? The Japanese were experimenting with alternative fuels and I have seen clues in the National Archives that she put to sea with one of these alternative types. Anybody else ever hear of such a thing?
 
Re: Yamato fuel
 
Posted By: Randy
Date: Tuesday, 17 October 2000, at 7:18 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Yamato fuel (Richard Wolff)
 
First question: standard, refined fuel oil, and
Second question: no.
 
Re: Yamato fuel
 
Posted By: Frido Kip <frido.kip@hetnet.nl>
Date: Tuesday, 17 October 2000, at 10:24 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Yamato fuel (Randy)
 
I agree, Yamato and her consorts appear to have used the last drops of fuel oil from the storage tanks, making it necessary to pump them out with hand pumps, can you imagine! The fuel had apparently been 
reserved for the escort forces, which as a consequence where left without any.
 
Re: Yamato Return??
 
Posted By: Allan Alsleben <Wildcat42@AOL.com>
Date: Friday, 13 October 2000, at 11:54 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: How many ships left? (Jon Parshall)
 
See what happens when one falls for these type of things?? Well, it doesn't surprise me. I learned that the fuel depot at Tokuyama was stocked for some kind of future operations. Maybe against operations at Kyushu, maybe??
 
Re: How many ships left?
 
Posted By: J. Ed Low <Lowj@tir.com>
Date: Saturday, 7 October 2000, at 6:54 a.m.
 
In Response To: How many ships left? (Jeff McGuire)
 
There is a book titled "Japanese Naval Vessels at The End of World War II" which was compiled by Shizuo Fukui and published by the U.S. Naval Institute. For a photo of book please see following link: http://www.ijn.dreamhost.com/Reference/Reference%20-%20Techical%20covers%2003.htm
It contains drawing and notes originally made by Mr. Fukui immediately after the war on this exact subject. It also contains photos of these ship at that time. If you are interested in this topic this would be the book.
 
Re: How many ships left?
 
Posted By: Bob Kugler <rkugler@optonline.net>
Date: Monday, 23 October 2000, at 3:44 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: How many ships left? (J. Ed Low)
 
I have a copy of The Maru Special--Japanese Naval Vessels, #23, (PB, 68pp, in Japanese) which has numerous B&W photos of Amagi, Katsuragi, Kasagi and Ikoma/Aso taken in 1946/47, plus wartime photos of Soryu, Hiryu and Taiho. Make an offer if you wish.
 
Re: How many ships left?
 
Posted By: Larry Evans <Lae519@aol.com>
Date: Saturday, 21 October 2000, at 8:35 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: How many ships left? (J. Ed Low)
 
Do you have any idea where I can find these books by Mr. Fukui?
 
Re: Fukui Books
 
Posted By: Randy
Date: Saturday, 21 October 2000, at 12:06 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: How many ships left? (Larry Evans)
 
You can purchase Fukui's,
"Japanese Vessels at the end of World War II,"
from The United States Naval Institute Press, listed at $47.95, ISBN 1-55750-274-9.
Contact the USNIP at 1-800-233-8764 or go to www.nip.org.
 
Re: How many ships left?
 
Posted By: Bob <Bob5@home.com>
Date: Saturday, 21 October 2000, at 10:31 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: How many ships left? (Larry Evans)
 
A poster on combinedfleet.com just noted that there is a list on-line at Warships of the world. Check this link:
http://warships1.com/Japan1.htm
 
Re: How many ships left?
 
Posted By: J. Ed Low <Lowj@tir.com>
Date: Sunday, 8 October 2000, at 5:59 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: How many ships left? (Jeff McGuire)
 
The reason I forwarded the reference is because a detailed answer to your question is very complex and probably best answer by looking at the book since there is so many ships. If you just want numbers, the answer is 6(6) carriers, 4(4) battlships, 11(8) cruisers, 42(12) destroyers and 58(4) submarines. These numbers are from Fukui's book. The number in () are the number of ships which were in damage condition.
 
Re: How many ships left?
 
Posted By: Grant Goodale <grant.goodale@sympatico.ca>
Date: Saturday, 7 October 2000, at 4:07 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: How many ships left? (J. Ed Low)
 
I have this book and I am told that it has an interesting provenance. It is alledged that the US Navy commissioned Fukui to do this study for their various records, assemeements, etc. Fukui properly fulfilled his contract and then published his findings in the 60's. The SBN is 991964-00-17. If this is true then good for Fukui-san!
 
Tachibera Maru (sp?)
 
Posted By: Chip <VShank@aol.com>
Date: Saturday, 26 August 2000, at 10:05 p.m.
 
I am a first time participant here looking for information on the WWII Japanese hospital ship "Tachibera Maru"(Sp?).
This ship was captured near the PI in August 1945 by two USN cruisers (destroyers?) on or about the same date as the bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. I am tryin to compile a rememberance of my father to pass on to my nephew, his grandson. My Dad is a retired doctor and was a Navy Pharmicists Mate 2CL working in a three man joint services
epidemiological unit (disease control) with two enlisted army medics (now both retired doctors) all over China and the south pacific for most of the War. He was in Manilla when they hauled this ship in and was NCOIC of deinfestation and clean-up. This is the hospital ship that was found to be carrying several thousand fully armed combat troops. Dad has told us that they had constructed "shelves" from deck to overhead and from a central isle both sides to the hull of the ship and stacked those guys in there like "chordwood". He still has no idea how they ate and etc. He is very humble about his his role in WWII ("I never fired a shot") but in this duty I feel he has touched an moment in history and I feel compelled to document the story and his service and contribution. Anyway, I would like to find a file photo of this ship and a history to include with some of his pictures and a small silk rising sun battle flag that he took off the ship in a framed historical rememberance of him before he's gone. Any help with reference publications, correct spelling, personal knowledge, newspaper clippings etc. about the Tachibera Maru will be greatly appreciated.
 
about TACHIBANA MARU
 
Posted By: Yutaka Iwasaki <navy_yard-iwa@mbj.sphere.ne.jp>
Date: Friday, 1 September 2000, at 8:25 a.m.
 
In Response To: Tachibera Maru (sp?) (Chip)
 
I find these documents on the web.
Drama of Fake Hospital Ship Capture
http://metalab.unc.edu/hyperwar/USN/ships/dafs/DD/dd581-drama.html
http://metalab.unc.edu/hyperwar/USN/ships/dafs/DD/dd581-mo-report.html
http://metalab.unc.edu/hyperwar/USN/ships/dafs/DD/dd581-action.html
http://metalab.unc.edu/hyperwar/USN/ships/dafs/DD/dd581.html
http://metalab.unc.edu/hyperwar/USN/ships/dafs/DD/dd582.html
 
Re: Tachibera Maru (sp?)
 
Posted By: Ron Wolford <wolfieeod@aol.com>
Date: Monday, 28 August 2000, at 8:32 p.m.
 
In Response To: Tachibera Maru (sp?) (Chip)
 
The Tachibana Maru also called the Titibana Maru was owned by the Tokiowan Kisen Steam Ship Company before the war. If you are looking for a picture of the Tachibana Maru the book "Japanese Passenger Ships in History" has 2 good photo, one pre war and one as a Hospital Ship, on page 202. This book used to be available from Pacific Front Hobbies but its expensive. The new book "The Yamato Dynasty" has a picture of the Tachibana Maru on page 206 but they call it the Huzi Maru (Trust Me it's the Tachibana Maru). If you want I will try to scan the page out of the Japanese Merchant Ship Recognition Manual and E-mail it to you but my copies are Xerox copies and I do not know how well they will come out. Hope this helps you out.
 
Re: Tachibera Maru (sp?)
 
Posted By: Lars Ahlberg <lars.ahlberg@halmstad.mail.postnet.se>
Date: Sunday, 27 August 2000, at 11:40 a.m.
 
In Response To: Tachibera Maru (sp?) (Chip)
 
A page called "Tokai Kisen's 'Tachibana Maru' in Her Last Days" can be found in "Sekai no Kansen" ("Ships of the World"), issue 4, 1998. Some data: Built 1935, 1,772 GRT, length 76.0m, beam 12.2m, 2 shafts, 2,400 HP, speed 15.5 knots, 1,230 passengers. The page has two photos.
 
Re: Tachibana Maru
 
Posted By: Tom Hall <hall41@ix.netcom.com>
Date: Sunday, 27 August 2000, at 1:51 a.m.
 
In Response To: Tachibera Maru (sp?) (Chip)
 
A hospital ship called Tachibana Maru is listed on
page 263 of the Jentschura, Jung & Mickel book,
Warships of the Imperial Japanese Navy, 1869-1945.
Says it was built in 1935, requisitioned as a hospital
ship in 1838 (1938), and used in "repatriation service"
until returned to her owners, who are not stated.
I once attempted to find photos of some obscure Maru
when I lived in Japan. There is precious little on
most of them. If the steamship company or its successor
is still around, they may have a photo. There are
a couple of good company histories of certain Japanese steamship companies, private printings, hard to find. Unfortunately, I can't tell you which line had owned her.
According to this reference book, "No ships were built specifically as hospital ships for the Imperial Japanese
Navy,..."
 
Re: Tachibana Maru
 
Posted By: Frido Kip <frido.kip@hetnet.nl>
Date: Sunday, 27 August 2000, at 5:42 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Tachibana Maru (Tom Hall)
 
Unfortunately, I was unable to find any specifics on Tachibana Maru, but I did find the following:
She was intercepted on 2 august 1945 by U.S. destroyers Conner (DD582) and Charette (DD581), searched and taken as a prize as she was carrying arms and ammo in red cross boxes. A prize crew of 80 marines and sailors were put on board and she was sent to Morotai in the Netherlands East Indies for further examination. What happened then is not mentioned.
 
Thanks to all
 
Posted By: Chip <VShank@aol.com>
Date: Sunday, 27 August 2000, at 7:42 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Tachibera Maru (sp?) (Lars Ahlberg)
 
I appreciate the information returned. Dad is 76 years old now, blind and not in good health so memories 
can fade. I will go back to him and recheck the facts as I understood them but I am certain he called the ship Tachibera Maru (although he was not sure of the spelling), and it was painted as a hospital ship and it was in Manilla Bay when he went aboard. The old man can still describe south China and the Phillipines as if he were there last week. As far as enemy troops being transported, I'm sure if there were they would have been removed by the time he went aboard. His knowledge of cargo could be partially based on scuttlebutt, although I seem to recall a Paul Harvey piece about 10-15 years ago that seemed to parallel Dad's story, which I remember him telling 40 years ago when I was a kid. Anyway, thanks for the help and any other info you might come across.
 
Tsurugisaki conversion
 
Posted By: Frido Kip <frido.kip@hetnet.nl>
Date: Tuesday, 27 June 2000, at 12:52 p.m.
 
I would like to convert the Hasegawa 1/700 aircraft carrier Shh into the submarine depot ship 
Tsurugisaki, as the P&I resin model appears to be no longer available.
However, I only have 2 pictures (Watts & Gordon, Polmar & Carpenter) and 1 drawing (Jentschura) to base the conversion on. Does anyone know if there are more photographs or better drawings available?
 
Re: Tsurugisaki conversion
 
Posted By: David Outten <DMOutten@cs.com>
Date: Tuesday, 27 June 2000, at 8:28 p.m.
 
In Response To: Tsurugisaki conversion (Frido Kip)
 
I don't know if this will help Frido, but on the website "Hazegray & Underway" under the topic, Naval History Information Center, click on World Aircraft Carrier List. It has both the Shoho her sister Zuiho. Under Shoho, it has the same picture Watts and Gordon use for the AS Tsurugisaki. But under the Zuiho it has a picture of the Takasaki still fitting out as an AS. It is an oblique port bow shot, but a close-up and quite detailed. Hope you can use it.
 
Re: Tsurugisaki conversion
 
Posted By: David Outten <DMOutten@cs.com>
Date: Tuesday, 27 June 2000, at 8:39 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Tsurugisaki conversion (David Outten)
 
Frido, that photograph was a starboard view not to port as mentioned earlier.
 
Re: Tsurugisaki conversion
 
Posted By: Frido Kip <frido.kip@hetnet.nl>
Date: Wednesday, 28 June 2000, at 10:32 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Tsurugisaki conversion (David Outten)
 
Great picture! Details are scarse in this early stage of construction but it is nonetheless very interesting. Also very interesting site, I have to go back there next time to go through it much more thoroughly!
 
Japanese Freighter "SHINYO MARU"
 
Posted By: Al McFarland
Date: Sunday, 25 June 2000, at 8:16 p.m.
 
I'm searching for info on this Japanese Freighter that was used to transfer American POW's from Davao POW camp # 2 alleged to be going to Manila, but really taking POW's to Japan to salve labor in the mines. She was torpodoed
by USS Paddle Sub and sunk in the Sindangan Bay, Mindanao Philippines on September 7, 1943.......the Shinyo Maru was not "lettered" as a POW transport.
They report that this ship was sunk late afternoon, 9-7-44 @ 8 degrees 11'N &
122 degrees 40'E just off the Sindangan Point (2 1/4 miles??) 83 souls survived
out of 750....many were trapped and pinned in the holds by torpedo caused debri.
many were bound, shot, and thrown into the sea. Four bodies washed up on the shore near Liloy. My brother was alleged to have been on this ship, too. I'm trying to ascertain the facts, but this file was classified until 1996. I would like to find the location. Information about this ship wreck, the souls that went to the bottom and the friendly fire sub are hard to come by.....The divers
in the Philippines are also unaware of this site....Anyone out there know about
where this wreck is located. Anyone heard of it. Anything, please. Thanks
 
Re: Japanese Freighter "SHINYO MARU"
 
Posted By: Randy <r.stone.eal@juno.com>
Date: Monday, 26 June 2000, at 12:23 p.m.
 
In Response To: Japanese Freighter "SHINYO MARU" (Al McFarland)
 
The following is from Clay Blair Jr., "Silent Victory," 1975, page 737:
"While patrolling a lifeguard station on the southwest tip of Mindoro (this is an obvious editing error, he must mean Mindanao -- Randy), Byron Nowell in Paddle found a small convoy. He sank one confirmed ship, Shiniyo Maru (sic), 2,500 tons. By happenstance, Shiniyo (sic) was transporting hundreds of Allied POWs being evacuated from Mindanao to Manila or the Empire. They had been herded into the holds and told by prison guards that if an American submarine attacked the ship they would kill them all. When Nowell's torpedoes struck home and the ship started down, the guards opened fire on the POWs with tommy guns. However, a hundred or more fought up through the hatches with clubs and improvised weapons and jumped over the side. About fifteen or twenty were picked up by Japanese boats engaged in rescuing Shiniyo (sic) survivors and were immediately shot. Eighty-one reached shore on Mindanao and made contact with friendly guerillas, who sent word for a submarine to evacuate them.
Christie ordered Narwhal, now commanded by Jack Clarence Titus, to rescue the POWs; he picked them up on the night of September 29 and proceeded toward the Admiralties. They were in pitiful condition and grateful for their escape..."
This is Randy speaking: if you could get hold of a manifest or document from the Narwhal rescue you may yet find some of these men, some of whom are likely still alive; they may be able to recall your brother and provide you with some kind of information.
 
Re: Japanese Freighter "SHINYO MARU"
 
Posted By: Yutaka Iwasaki <navy_yard-iwa@mbj.sphere.ne.jp>
Date: Monday, 26 June 2000, at 7:50 a.m.
 
In Response To: Japanese Freighter "SHINYO MARU" (Al McFarland)
 
From 'WARTIME SHIP HISTORY' by Shinsitiro Komamiya,@1991.
Shinyo Maru
2,634 gross ton
Captured ship(No owner)
7.Sept.1944 02:00 departed from Zamboanga, Mindanao for Manila P.I.
Convoy of 5 ships (Shinyo maru, Miho maru(salvage ship), #2Eiyo maru, Kamitu(Kozu?) maru, Ryuko maru(2,813 ton))
and 2 escorts (Kiso maru, #55Sub chaser).
7.Sept.1944 16:59 torpedoed at 08-12N, 122-37E (7km north from Sindangan Point, Mindanao Is.)
3 hits at portside. 1st below foremast, 2nd at No.2 hold, 3rd between No.5 Hold and poop.
The hull broke into two at foremast, fore part sank immediately, and the latter part in 4 minutes.
15 crews and 797 passengers died.
Next day(8.Sept.1944) Ryuko maru was torpedoed and sunk in Sulu sea(330 troopers and 16 crews died).
Enroute Manila, Miho maru and #2Eiyo maru were also damaged by torpedoes but survived.
I pray for the repose of victim's soul.
 
Re: Japanese Freighter "SHINYO MARU"
 
Posted By: Jim Broshot <jbroshot@socket.net>
Date: Sunday, 25 June 2000, at 9:52 p.m.
 
In Response To: Japanese Freighter "SHINYO MARU" (Al McFarland)
 
For what it is worth.
From U. S. Submarine Attacks During World War II (John D. Alden) 1989 edition:
From US sources:
Date: 7 September 1944
Time: 1700 hours
Submarine: USS Paddle (SS-263)(Seventh War Patrol)
Position: 08-11N, 122-40E
From Japanese sources:
XAP or AK 1C, 2634 or 2518 tons, Shinyo Maru
sunk at 08-12N, 122-37E
Hope this is of some help.
 
Seaplane Tenders?
 
Posted By: Dave Smith <gannet@cftnet.com>
Date: Wednesday, 21 June 2000, at 10:48 a.m.
 
I would appreciate any leads on books (in or out of print), magazine articles, or websites concerning the operations of post-1920s seaplane tenders, of any nation. I am especially interested in descriptions of just -how- these ships dealt with the day-to-day technical challenges of maintaining aircraft.
Also interested in similar for military seaplanes, although this seems to be much easier to find than info on the tenders.
 
Re: Seaplane Tenders?
 
Posted By: Dave Smith <gannet@cftnet.com>
Date: Monday, 3 July 2000, at 4:13 p.m.
 
In Response To: Seaplane Tenders? (Dave Smith)
 
For my fellow seaplane/floatplane fans,
I found an interesting little book published on the Web today: "Cruiser Scout - Recollections of War in the Pacific". It's a firsthand account by a radio operator/technician in floatplanes. Goes from before Pearl to after the war. Good stuff, check it out: http://www.commpro.com/navy /
 
Re: Seaplane Tenders?
 
Posted By: Raymond Smith <ssfwb1@bellatlantic.net>
Date: Friday, 30 June 2000, at 6:40 p.m.
 
In Response To: Seaplane Tenders? (Dave Smith)
 
Dave, In addition to Frido's tip on the Breyer book, I think this may also be of
some help. " Before the Aircraft Carrier " - The Development of Aviation Vessels
1849-1922. I know it is outside your date criteria, but! Unless of course you are already in possesion of it. I have an interest in the same area also. Look forward the reply stream.
 
Re: Seaplane Tenders?
 
Posted By: Dave Smith <gannet@cftnet.com>
Date: Monday, 3 July 2000, at 8:41 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Seaplane Tenders? (Raymond Smith)
 
Thanks for the leads, to you and all respondents.
In running searches at http://www.abebooks.com / I found enough interesting titles to render me broke. One in particular looks like a first-hand seaplane tender account:
USS CHINCOTEAGUE; The Ship That Wouldn't Sink, Murphy, Frank D.
At this point it looks like most mention of seaplane tenders today is "in passing", in books that are ostensibly about other subjects.
Somebody ought to do this up right. :)
 
Re: Seaplane Tenders?
 
Posted By: Jon Parshall <jonp@is.com>
Date: Monday, 3 July 2000, at 1:30 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Seaplane Tenders? (Dave Smith)
 
The Naval Technical Mission to Japan reports also contain information on the aviation handling equipment aboard Japanese tenders. It's Report #A-11: Aircraft Arrangements and Handling Facilities in Japanese Naval Vessels.
 
Re: Seaplane Tenders?
 
Posted By: Jim Broshot <jbroshot@socket.net>
Date: Wednesday, 21 June 2000, at 5:02 p.m.
 
In Response To: Seaplane Tenders? (Dave Smith)
 
ESCORT CARRIERS AND AVIATION SUPPORT SHIPS OF THE US NAVY (Stefan Terzibaschitsch) ISBN 0-8317-2979-1 (Conway Press, but my copy issued by U S Naval Institute) 1981
has brief chapter on "AV/AVP/AVD Seaplane Tenders"
if nothing else a complete roster of US ships of this ilk, starting with AV-1 USS WRIGHT
lots of photos
 
Re: Seaplane Tenders?
 
Posted By: Frido Kip <frido.kip@hetnet.nl>
Date: Wednesday, 21 June 2000, at 12:48 p.m.
 
In Response To: Seaplane Tenders? (Dave Smith)
 
Unfortunately, sources on seaplane tenders are scarse. I could find no sources that completely match your interest. Let's hope that this situation will change in the future. Here's what I did find:
There are some interesting articles in the annual 'Warship' (Conway Maritime Press/Naval Institute Press):
1989: Naval warfare in new dimensions - pre 1920, but historical account of seaplane use in the Great War.
1990: Engadine at Jutland - again pre 1920, but a very detailed operational description of Engadine's virtually unknown contribution to the Battle of Jutland.
1993: Flights of fancy - on shipboard launch and recovery systems.
Even if you can't read German, Siegfried Breyer's 'Flugzeugkreuzer, Flugzeugmutterschiffe, Flugzeugtender bis 1945 (Seaplane cruisers, Seaplane motherships, Seaplane tenders till 1945)' might be an interesting booklet. It is small but contains several unusual photographs and reasonably accurate drawings of Japanese, American, British, Italian, French, Russian, Swedish and Spanish tenders. For instance, it shows photographs of the Japanese seaplane carrier Nisshin and the flying boat depot ship Akitsushima, which is very rare! However, there's not much here on their actual operational use. It is published as the Marine-Arsenal Sonderheft Band 9 by Podzun Pallas Verlag. I hope it's still out there.
 
Hokoku Maru's planes
 
Posted By: Sander Kingsepp <sander.kingsepp@neti.ee>
Date: Sunday, 11 June 2000, at 7:51 a.m.
 
Did the armed merchant cruisers Hokoku and Aikoku Maru carry any planes during their last sortie as a pair in November 1942?
 
Re: Hokoku Maru's planes
 
Posted By: Frido Kip <frido.kip@hetnet.nl>
Date: Monday, 12 June 2000, at 6:02 a.m.
 
In Response To: Hokoku Maru's planes (Sander Kingsepp)
 
Hokoku Maru and Aikoku Maru each carried two Type 94 reconnaissance seaplanes (ALF) during their first sortie to the South Pacific (one of these was actually a reserve plane). Aikoku Marus Z-1 was lost during this mission.
When they returned to Hiroshima on 13 February 1942 both ships were refitted at Kure. The armament was updated and new Type 2 fighter seaplanes (RUFE) were shipped, again two each. The raiders left with this complement on 10 March 1942 for their operational area in the Indian Ocean, where Hokoku Maru was eventually lost on 11 November 1942.
 
Re: Hokoku Maru's planes
 
Posted By: Sander Kingsepp <sander.kingsepp@neti.ee>
Date: Monday, 12 June 2000, at 7:16 a.m.
 
Thanks a lot, Frido (especially for the tailcode). Anyway, was the second type really A6M2-N 
 
(Rufe)- I mean, the plane had been barely tested by that time?
Curiously enough, Dutch eyewitnesses seem to have witnessed 2 aircraft thrown off the deck when Hokoku Maru was sunk.
 
Re: Hokoku Maru's planes
 
Posted By: Frido Kip <frido.kip@hetnet.nl>
Date: Monday, 12 June 2000, at 1:02 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Hokoku Maru's planes (Sander Kingsepp)
 
I must admit that I had the same doubt as you. However, as two different authors stated the same complement from different sources I assumed they were right. Moreover, I had looked it up before I sent you the original answer. Mikesh states that the Type 2 fighter seaplane was only officially taken in production in July 1942, but according to Francillon production may have started earlier, making this a possibility.
Nonetheless, I still shared your doubts and therefore I've now looked a little further. I have a vague picture of the Waveline kit of Aikoku Maru that clearly carries a twin float seaplane, which can only be a Type 0 reconnaissance seaplanes (JAKE) at this date. Unfortunately, I could find nothing in my sources to confirm this, with one exception. Watts shows a photo of Hokoku Maru in July 1942 with a single twin-float seaplane aft, which is moreover much too long to be a Rufe. Therefore, both converted cruisers probably carried two Jakes each and not Rufes.
As I stated before Hokoku Maru did indeed carry two seaplanes, as did her sister. They were carried on top of the hatches of nos. 4 and 5 holds aft in the ship. This was the area hit in Hokoku Maru, destroying the two seaplanes.
 
Posted By: Jim Broshot <jbroshot@socket.net>
Date: Saturday, 17 June 2000, at 10:57 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Hokoku Maru's planes (Frido Kip)
 
Received a long awaited copy of HISTORY OF THE ROYAL REGIMENT OF ARTILLERY: THE FAR EAST THEATER 1941 - 46 today.
At Page 120 - 121, it states that on 11 Nov 1942, SW of the Cocos Islands in the Indian Ocean, "two large Japanese armed raiders" attacked HMIS Bengal (called a corvette) and the MV Ondina (carrying 3 Maritime Royal Artillery gunners and five naval ratings with 1x 4inch gun, 1x 20mm gun and various machine guns). The Ondina's guns hit and sank one of the raiders.
My copy of WARSHIP LOSSES OF WORLD WAR TWO lists the armed merchant cruiser HOKOKU MARU as sunk near the Cocos Islands on this date by "3in gunfire of RIN minesweeper BENGAL and 4in gunfire of Dutch tanker Ondina."
Anybody know what the other raider/armed merchant cruiser was?
 
Re: Hokoku Maru's planes - Fate of the Hokoku Maru
 
Posted By: Frido Kip <frido.kip@hetnet.nl>
Date: Sunday, 18 June 2000, at 4:04 a.m.
 
In Response To: Hokoku Maru's planes - Fate of the Hokoku Maru (Jim Broshot)
 
The other armed merchant cruiser was Hokoku Maru's sister Aikoku Maru.
During a raid into the Indian Ocean they encountered the minesweeper HMIS Bengal and the motor tanker Ondina on 11 November 1942 at 11:30 in the position 19-45S by 92-40E. Trying to protect the tanker, Bengal closed the range with Hokoku Maru, which opened fire at 12:12. Both ships were damaged in the ensuing action. At this time Aikoku Maru was some 6 miles to the NW and closing. Then a lucky hit from Ondine's 4in gun on the starboard torpedo tubes, detonated Hokoku Maru's torpedoes and blew off the stern, leaving her sinking (there's some uncertainty on which ship scored this hit, but Japanese sources apparently credit the hit to Ondine). Aikoku Maru now joined the fight. Bengal was hit again and had to disengage. Aikoku Maru then shifted her attention to Ondine, hitting her several times and closing. With her ammunition expanded, the crew abandoned the tanker, but Aikoku Maru was unable the sink the vessel, despite the use of torpedoes. By now Hokoku Maru had gone down and Aikoku Maru rescued 278 members of her crew before firing a last torpedo at Ondine and leaving the scene. The crew was able to reentered the ship, patch her up and reach Fremantle.
 
Re: Hokoku Maru's planes - Fate of the Hokoku Maru
 
Posted By: Jim Broshot <jbroshot@socket.net>
Date: Sunday, 18 June 2000, at 8:26 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Hokoku Maru's planes - Fate of the Hokoku Maru (Frido Kip)
 
The Royal Artillery history (naturally) credits the gun crew in the Ondina. It states the Bengal was set on fire and had to sheer off. The crew on the Ondina then got two hits, after which the raider began to sink.
 
Re: Hokoku Maru's planes
 
Posted By: Ron Wolford <wolfieeod@aol.com>
Date: Wednesday, 14 June 2000, at 7:19 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Hokoku Maru's planes (Sander Kingsepp)
 
Here is my 2-cents worth. In Maru Special #53 there are five
pictures of the Hokoku Maru and Aikoku Maru at Singapore in July
of 1942. The Hokoku Maru is shown with one Type O reconnaissance
seaplane (JAKE) on top of hatch #4 and the Aikoku Maru has one on
top of hatch #4 and one on hatch #5. Hope this help you out.
 
Re: Hokoku Maru's planes
 
Posted By: Sander Kingsepp <sander.kingsepp@neti.ee>
Date: Monday, 19 June 2000, at 6:44 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Hokoku Maru's planes (Ron Wolford)
 
So the second type was definitely Jake.
BTW, a book complied by Kazutoshi Hando (NIPPON GUNKAN SENKI, 2nd edition Tokyo 1996)contains an account by Hokoku Maru's Chief Orderly, Mr Eiichi Nakajima. Although his description about the sinking of Hokoku Maru is somewhat spotty, it contains interesting details about how the Japanese intended to use their merchant cruisers (or Q-ships as Nakajima called them). Before the outbreak of the war there were regular drills on both ships how to disguise the off-duty hands as women (using wheat flour instead of makeup) - just as it was reportedly done on British Q-ships during WW I.
 
Diahatsu Landing Craft on Cruisers
 
Posted By: John Sutherland <john.sutherland@amcom.co.nz>
Date: Saturday, 13 May 2000, at 8:16 p.m.
 
Lacroix says that Nagara in her last refit was converted to a fast troop ship and as such provided with a 13m Diahatsu landing craft and a "special" 10m freight lighter. No indication of where these were carried, but assumably given the size they were either on the top deck where the catapult was and / or the main deck beside the "cut away" area.
However, my question is how did they get these heavy lumps on and off the ship?
They would seem to be too heavy for boat davits. Did Nagara re-embark her aircraft crane removed with the catapult?
This would cover Nagara, but what about those 14m Diahatsu Landing Craft that Kitikami and Ooi (Oi?) embarked in place of the nos 7 and 8 torpedo mounts? Neither of these ships ever had a crane (they never had a catapult and aircraft) so if they embarked a crane - what pattern was it? Note - Kitakami did embark a 10 ton crane ex Chiyoda in 1944 but we are talking 1942 here.
Comments? Suggestions?
Anyone know of a source of 700 scale "special 10m freight lighters"? Could that be the funny shaped boat on the supplementary set that now comes with T/H/F/A kits?
 
Re: Diahatsu Landing Craft on Cruisers
 
Posted By: Dan Kaplan <dboykap@aol.com>
Date: Tuesday, 23 May 2000, at 9:10 a.m.
 
In Response To: Diahatsu Landing Craft on Cruisers (John Sutherland)
 
I was thumbing thru Lacroix & Wells and came across additional information. Late war modifications for CL Naka included embarking 4 of the 10m freight lighters (shohatsu) for transport & landing operations. These are apparently similar to the 14M, just smaller at 6.52 tons with a 60 hp gasoline engine and capable of carrying 3.3 tons of cargo or 35 men. Similarly, Isuzu embarked 2 as did Nagara. All indications are that Naka & Isuzu retained their aircraft handling cranes and I was under the impression that Nagara did as well.
Oi & Kitakami embarked 4 of the 14m and 2 of the 10m lighters after conversion. 30 ton capacity aircraft cranes were taken from Chitose, then under conversion to a CVL, and installed. The Chitose/Chiyoda conversions begain late '42.
The Skywave/Pitroad set for IJN BBs carries a number of freight lighters, though, I can't remember which ones.
 
Re: Diahatsu Landing Craft on Cruisers
 
Posted By: John Sutherland <john.sutherland@amcom.co.nz>
Date: Wednesday, 24 May 2000, at 12:01 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Diahatsu Landing Craft on Cruisers (Dan Kaplan)
 
Your thoughts on Nagara are in-line with mine. Lacroix & Wells suggests the crane was removed when the catapult was landed, but I think either that is not correct or it was re-embarked. L&W gives Nagara as embarking a 10m and a 14m.
The info on Oi and Kitakami confuses me. According to L&W the outfit you described was part of the proposed 1943 conversion which, according to L&W, never eventuated. (However I have seen other references, eg. Watts, which said it did). Kitakami did get the 30ton crane in 1944 when converted to a Kaiten carrier.
However, from mid-42 (aug/Sep) they carried 2 14m replacing the nos 7 & 8 tubes. This was too early for any cranes from Chitose or Chiyoda so how did they get them on/off board? I am assuming they embarked an aircraft handling crane similar to Nagara but this would have required rear mast modification. Oh for a photo!!!
 
Japanese Seaplane Tenders
 
Posted By: Allan Alsleben <Wildcat42@AOL.com>
Date: Sunday, 23 April 2000, at 5:27 p.m.
 
Can anyone of the experts out there give me the dates of commission on these 10 units? The only thing I have is the year. I'm trying to narrow them down. These were the Maru's like in Sagara Maru and such.
 
Re: Japanese Seaplane Tenders
 
Posted By: Frido Kip <frido.kip@hetnet.nl>
Date: Sunday, 14 May 2000, at 10:25 a.m.
 
In Response To: Japanese Seaplane Tenders (Allan Alsleben)
 
As I recently obtained the new Skywave Kimikawa Maru kit I thought this would be a good reason to do some research on your question.
In 1937 three conversions were ordered as a responds to the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese conflict. These were Kamikawa Maru, Kagu Maru and Kinugasa Maru, all three operation in 1938. Two of these, Kagu and Kinugasa Maru were rerated transports before the start of the Pacific War on 8 December 1941. Kamikawa Maru remained a seaplane carrier until her loss on 28 May 43.
In 1941 five more conversions were ordered, resulting in enlistment of Kimikawa Maru, Kiyokawa Maru, Sany Maru (all three Aug-Sep 41), Sagara Maru (20 Sep 41) and Sanuki Maru (5 Sep 41). On 14 July 1942 Kunikawa Maru was also enlisted (attached to the fourth fleet).
Sagara and Sanuki Maru were rerated transports on 1 Dec 42, Kiyokawa and Sany Maru on 1 Apr 43 and Kimikawa and Kunikawa Maru on 1 Oct 43.
As far as I know there is no tenth converted seaplane carrier.
I hope that this will help you out.
 
Re: Japanese Seaplane Tenders
 
Posted By: Allan Alsleben <Wildcat42@AOL.com>
Date: Sunday, 14 May 2000, at 4:29 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Japanese Seaplane Tenders (Frido Kip)
 
Then, can you identify which of the 3 that were in service in 1938, were attached to the 3rd Air Division or Carrier Division during the Sino-Japanese Conflict? And also what the dates were? I only know of Kamikawa Maru, however, there is some indication that Kinugasa Maru was also involved. There has not been a very clear picture on the activities of these Seaplane Tenders......
 
Re: Japanese Seaplane Tenders
 
Posted By: Frido Kip <frido.kip@hetnet.nl>
Date: Monday, 15 May 2000, at 2:15 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Japanese Seaplane Tenders (Allan Alsleben)
 
I could not find much on these three seaplane carriers. All three were converted for use in Chinese waters and were attached to the China Area Fleet in 1938. However, at that time this fleet actually consisted of the 3rd, 4th and 5th fleets, but no mention is made to which fleets and/or squadrons these three ships belonged and where they were operating. The fleets were renamed China Expeditionary Fleets on 15 November 1939.
When a new 3rd Fleet was formed on 10 April 1941 for use in the Philippine area Kamikawa Maru and Sany Maru formed the 12th carrier squadron of that fleet. Kagu and Kinugasa Maru were probably rerated transports at this time. The 3rd Fleet was dissolved on 10 March 1942. Also note that the new 5th Fleet, which was formed on 25 July 1941 for the North Pacific area, included the Kimikawa Maru.
Another fact that I found that may interest you is that all three seaplane carriers carried 12 seaplanes when converted, four Type 94 and eight Type 95 reconnaissance seaplanes (maximum allowance).
 
Brazil Maru
 
Posted By: M. Kelso <seaagg98@aol.com>
Date: Wednesday, 19 April 2000, at 8:38 p.m.
 
Thank you for the responses to my last posting. Apparently sometime after the first Brazil Maru was sunk another vessel was commisioned with the same name. This vessel was in Takao, Formosa the first two weeks of 1945 and arrived at Moji, Japan around January 29, 1945. The vessel master was named Shin Kajiyama. Is there any information out there about this mystery Brazil Maru.
I also seek infomation on these other merchant vessels:
Shinyo Maru (Lost 9/44 off Mindanao)
Yashu Maru
Arisan Maru (Lost 10/44)
 
Arisan Maru
Posted By: Yutaka Iwasaki <navy_yard-iwa@mbj.sphere.ne.jp>
Date: Monday, 29 May 2000, at 8:02 a.m.
In Response To: Brazil Maru (M. Kelso)
Arisan@maru
Steel cargo ship@iWartime standard type@2Aj@6,866 gross ton
Dimension@(Lpp~B~D)@128.00m ~18.20m ~11.10m
Main Engine@turbine@2,000SHP
Speed@10(continuous)/13.0(max)@kt
Builder@Mitsui-Senpaku shipping co.iTokyoj
Shipyard@Mitsui-ZoseniTamano city,Okayama pref. JAPANj@Yard No.376
Keel lay 30.Apr. 1944@
Launch@@ 5.June.1944@
Complete@22.June.1944
Sunk @@24.Oct. 1944@
at Bashi Channel(20!46N, 118!18E) by USS-279 SNOOK torpedo
 
Shinyo maru
4,658 gross ton
Builder Nihon-Suisan
Sunk 21.Sept.1944
East-East-South off SIBUYAN Island N12!23 E122!50
by air raid
 
Yashu Maru
1,873 gross ton
captured ship
Sunk 23.JAN.1943
at S05!40-E120!35 off South Celebes Is. by submarine
 
(another)
Yashu Maru
2,655 gross ton
Owner Korean-Yusen
Sunk 13.Feb.1944
at Holandja imubi-bay (spelling unknown), New Guinea by air raid
 
(correction)Arisan Maru
 
Posted By: Yutaka Iwasaki <navy_yard-iwa@mbj.sphere.ne.jp>
Date: Monday, 29 May 2000, at 8:06 a.m.
 
In Response To: Arisan Maru (Yutaka Iwasaki)
 
Arisan Maru
(wrong) 6,866 gross ton
(right) 6,886 gross ton
 
Re: Arisan Maru
 
Posted By: Dale Wilber <SCRIBEV@AOL.COM>
Date: Sunday, 4 June 2000, at 9:55 a.m.
 
In Response To: (correction)Arisan Maru (Yutaka Iwasaki)
 
The Arisan Maru was sunk in the afternoon not in the Morning. The logical choice for the sinking Submarine is the Shark II. It was the last ship sunk in a convoy of 12.
 
Re: Arisan Maru
 
Posted By: Yutaka Iwasaki <navy_yard-iwa@mbj.sphere.ne.jp>
Date: Thursday, 8 June 2000, at 7:14 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Arisan Maru (Dale Wilber)
 
Shark II might sunk Arisan Maru.
The convoy(12 marus and 5 escorts) was scattered by at least 5 submarines attack.
Each maru was attacked repeatedly, from both sides, some torpedoes didn't explode or harmless.
Each submarine claimed their credit, but SS314 SHARK couldn't because it's sunk.
 
Submarines data
SS314 SHARK OCT.24
At 06:15 last transmission to SEADRAGON
lost ?:? N20!41'N;118!-27'E according to Japaese antisubmarine attacks records
At 18:58, SEADRAGON tried unsuccessfully to raise SHARK.
 
attcked Wolf Pack group
Banister's Beagle's(SS276 SAWFISH, SS367 ICEFISH, SS228 DRUM)
Blakely's Behemoths(SS194 SEADRAGON, SS221 BLACKFISH, SS314 SHARK)
? (SS279 SNOOK, ?, ?)
 
The list below is from the book 'Ship Artillery 2' by SINSITIRO KOMAMIYA, publisher SYUPPAN-KYODOSYA co. 1981.
Convoy 'HARUKAZE' Manila to Kaosiung(Formosa)
Seq. name gross owner sunk date time location credit
12 KIMIKAWA MARU 6,863t KAWASAKI-KISEN 23 17:30 N18!58 E118!46 SS276 SAWFISH(Banister group)
1 KOKURYU MARU 7,369t OSAKA-SHOSEN 24 01:00 N19!42 E118!38 SS194 SEADRAGON(Blakely group)
2 KIKUSUI MARU 3,887t captured ship 24 03:15 N19!46 E118!30 SS279 SNOOK
9 TENSIN MARU 4,236t ZUIKO-SHOSEN 24 06:05 N19!54 E119!00 SS367 ICEFISH(Banister group)
4 SIGISAN MARU 4,725t MITSUI-SENPAKU 24 07:59 N20!10 E118!30 SS228 DRUM (Banister group)
5 DAITEN MARU 4,642t OSAKA-SHOSEN 24 11:20 N20!12 E119!01 SS194 SEADRAGON(Blakely group)
7 #1SINSEI MARU 5,878t HARA-SHOJI 24 12:25 N20!31 E118!42 SS279 SNOOK
6 EIKOU MARU 1,847t NIHON-YUSEN 24 14:05 N20!35 E118!32 SS194 SEADRAGON(Blakely group)
8 ARISAN MARU 6,886t MITSUI-SENPAKU 24 17:30 N20!00 E118!44 SS279 SNOOK
(N20!46 E118!18 in another book)
 
survived
3 RYOFU MARU 1,181t Ministry of Education
10 #3TOYO MARU 985t SAWAYAMA-KAIUN
11 EIKAI MARU 175t Army
 
Escorts
3 Destoroyers(HARUKAZE,TAKE,KURETAKE)
1 Mine layer(KURASAKI)
1 submarine chaser(#20)
 
Cargo list
Seq.
1 KOKURYU MARU 1,357 Japanese, some ship lost crew,@494 funeral ashes
2 KIKUSUI MARU ammunition
3 RYOFU MARU unknown
4 SIGISAN MARU 3,300t manganese ore, 3,000t raw rubber, 1,500t general goods
5 DAITEN MARU empty
6 EIKOU MARU empty
7 #1SINSEI MARU 8,000t bauxite ore,
8 ARISAN MARU 1,781 POW, 204 ship lost crew, 125 another Japanese
9 TENSIN MARU 6,250t bauxite ore
10 #3TOYO MARU unknown
11 EIKAI MARU unknown
12 KIMIKAWA MARU unknown
 
Japanese Ships
 
Posted By: M. Kelso <seaagg98@aol.com>
Date: Wednesday, 5 April 2000, at 9:14 a.m.
 
Do any of our friends in Japan have access to pictures of the following merchant vessels that operated in World War Two?
Oryoku Maru
Enoura Maru
Brazil Maru
 
Re: Japanese Ships
 
Posted By: JPModeler <navy_yard-iwa@mbj.sphere.ne.jp>
Date: Wednesday, 19 April 2000, at 7:29 a.m.
 
In Response To: Japanese Ships (M. Kelso)
 
Oryoku Maru
http://www1.odn.ne.jp/~aac89510/sbs/Senbotsu1FILE/kamomidori.html
On her side, marking in 'hiragana' character as 'A-FU-RYO-KU-MA-RU'
sunked 14DEC1944 10:20 at subic bay by US air raid
Enoura Maru
cargo ship?
Brazil Maru
http://www1.odn.ne.jp/~aac89510/sbs/Senbotsu1FILE/burajiru.html
sunked 5AUG1942 00:58 en route truk to yokosukai09.51N-150.46Ej by USSUB
 
Re: Japanese Ships
 
Posted By: William <IRISHODOWD@aol.com>
Date: Thursday, 6 April 2000, at 5:18 p.m.
 
In Response To: Japanese Ships (M. Kelso)
 
Concerning the Brazil Maru she was built in 1919 by Kawasaki shipyard
in Kobe Dimensions 385x51x27'1" spd 9kts 5860 gross tons. She is one
of many sisterships built by Kawasaki after WW1 I have pictures of two
sisterships ( Holland Maru and Atlantic Maru ) book: The Worlds Merchant
Fleets, 1939 by Rodger Jordan new book availible at any large book store
ie... Barnes and Noble
 
Re: Japanese Ships
 
Posted By: Ingo Hohm
Date: Wednesday, 5 April 2000, at 10:24 a.m.
 
In Response To: Japanese Ships (M. Kelso)
 
Brazil Maru is feature at the US Naval Historical Center's Online Library.
Link: http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-fornv/japan/japsh-b/brazil-m.htm
 
Japanese Merchant Marines
 
Posted By: Paul Richards <c2water@vianet.net.au>
Date: Monday, 6 March 2000, at 8:15 p.m.
 
During WW2, the Japanese Merchant navy suffered huge losses, over 6,000,000 tons of ships sunk.
There is an excellent web site for the American Merchant Maeines and the ships they sailed, but very little about the Japanese.
I would be interested if some one knows of a web site which gives some insite to the the ships and crews. What kind of training did they get? I have read a report where one ship was so poorly made that it was sunk by a 500 pound bomb that did not even hit the ship, but went off in the water near it. Also I have read where the Japanese refered to the crews on cargo ships as 'fish food'.
From what I can ascertain, in the latter parts of the war, the ships were constructed on the basis that they would only last 2 trips, if lucky. The 'Engin Maru' was commissioned in Nov. 44 and sunk in the first week of Feb. 45.It lasted only a couple of months.
 
Re: Japanese Merchant Marines
 
Posted By: Ron Wolford <wolfieeod@aol.com>
Date: Thursday, 9 March 2000, at 7:10 a.m.
 
In Response To: Japanese Merchant Marines (Paul Richards)
 
The Japanese Merchant Marine was one of the most if not the most modern and efficient merchant marines prior to WWII. Other than the book by Mark Parillo there is very little information out there on the Japanese Merchant Marine. The only books (that I know of)that list the ships our the ONI (Office of Naval Intelligence)manuals. There is a new book by Naval Institute Press "The Worlds Merchant Fleets, 1939" I have not seen this book yet so I do not have any info on it. If your really obsess (like me) the Naval Historical Foundation Historical services can poto copy the ONI manuals for you. There are 3 different manuals to chose from.
ONI 208-J Japanese Merchant Ship Recognition Mannual, dated 24 Aug 1942. 268pg. List most of the ships over 4000 tons, has 2 pages of stack marking and house flags. If you order this get these two pages in color. All three manuals give the following info for each class of ship, name, gross tonnage, length, beam, draft, speed, when built, machinery, fuel, radius, complement, owners, and potential naval value. Most classes have at least one picture of the ships.
ONI 208-J Revised no date but I think 1944. 555pg. A much more in depth manual supersede 208-J. List the entire above plus most of the ships smaller than 4000 tons and includes all the ship captured by Japan at the start of the war. Dose not list owners but all other info listed above.
ONI 208-J Supplement 3 Standard Classes of Japanese Merchant Ships January 1945. 14pg. List the war built Merchant Ships Classes.
 
Re: Japanese Merchant Marines
 
Posted By: Jim Broshot <jbroshot@socket.net>
Date: Tuesday, 7 March 2000, at 6:54 p.m.
 
In Response To: Japanese Merchant Marines (Paul Richards)
 
Not a website, but Naval Institute Press published a book some years ago that might answer some of your 
questions:
THE JAPANESE MERCHANT MARINE IN WORLD WAR II (Mark P. Parillo) (1993)
ISBN 1-55750-677-9
Manning is discussed in part and the author notes that besides drafting ships for military (army and navy) use, the military took merchant marine officers ans seamen for naval duties, leaving the ships manned by inexperienced and untrained crews which were drawn in part from sailors from the occupied territories.
"In time of manpower shortages, inexperienced crews had to be 20 percent larger on average to compensate for their inefficiency."
 
Re: Japanese Merchant Marines
 
Posted By: Graham Boak <graham@boak98.freeserve.co.uk>
Date: Tuesday, 7 March 2000, at 2:38 p.m.
 
In Response To: Japanese Merchant Marines (Paul Richards)
 
Don't be too scathing about the build standard of that ship - the blast effect from a bomb alongside a ship is magnified by the water and will do more damage than a "direct" hit. As one admiral said, it seems more effective to let water into the bottom of a ship than air into the top. And there were these dams in Germany.......
 
I-Go-Kosoku-Tei: What ship is that?
 
Posted By: Ingo Hohm <iho@datenrevision.de>
Date: Wednesday, 23 February 2000, at 1:29 a.m.
 
Probably a bit far-off, but this Message-board seems to fir best to the question:
I have a 1/1250 model of a small japanese craft (made by Trident). The Manufacturer lists it as I-Go-Kosoku-Tei and offers two versions. According to the manufacturers list both versions are from 1944 and have been built in considerable number (60 and 40). I could not find this craft in Jentschura,Jung,Mickel: "Die Schiffe der japanische Marine", so I am stuck.
Does anybody know what craft this was and for what purpose it was build? Has anybody technical data? And an explanation why it might be omitted in a major reference book about the japanese navy (or why I did not find it there)?
I guess the name is not an individual name, but a type designation. Could anybody translate it?
 
Re: I-Go-Kosoku-Tei: What ship is that?
 
Posted By: C. C. Cheng <cheng.150@osu.edu>
Date: Thursday, 24 February 2000, at 2:26 p.m.
 
In Response To: I-Go-Kosoku-Tei: What ship is that? (Ingo Hohm)
 
I wish I can help, but I don't know Japanese either. I guess
it's Type 1( I-Go) high speed(kosoku) boat(tei). Well, that's
based on the similarity of Chinese pronunciation. Maybe someone
who know Japanese well can help you latter on.
Here is a website of IJN small warships. Unfortunately, you need
some software to read the Japanese. But there are profile diagrams,
You perhaps can match those diagram to find your boat.
For the monitor
http://www.down.ne.jp/ish/ijn/axhist/ksoran.html
For the subchaser
http://www.down.ne.jp/ish/ijn/axhist/scsoran.html
For the gunboat
http://www.down.ne.jp/ish/ijn/gbhist/soran.html
For the minesweeper
http://www.down.ne.jp/ish/ijn/mshist/soran.html
For the conveyer
http://www.down.ne.jp/ish/ijn/lshist/soran.html
 
Re: I-Go-Kosoku-Tei: What ship is that?
 
Posted By: Ingo Hohm <iho@datenrevision.de>
Date: Friday, 25 February 2000, at 1:16 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: I-Go-Kosoku-Tei: What ship is that? (C. C. Cheng)
 
Thanks for your help.
The links - although interesting - are leading to well-known
ships - all larger than the mystery one. If it were one of those I would not have posted my question.
After posting it I found somewhere in my own papers a remark about the
mysterious craft, telling that it is a highspeed army transport.
That would fit both to the look of the model (it is something like a fat and slightly oversized PT without torpedo-armament) and your translation.
I guess the army did not have many types like this (thus the type 1 sounds reasonable) and the designation "highspeed" would fit both the model an the remark. And it certainly is so small, that one would call it boat rather than ship.
The other version most probably is this utilized in some other role.
It is a somewhat strange idea that the army owned speedboats, but the japanese army even had submarines (small ones for transportation), so a transport-speedboat is not unreasonable.
 
Re: I-Go-Kosoku-Tei: What ship is that?
 
Posted By: Hiroyuki Takeuchi
Date: Friday, 25 February 2000, at 1:41 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: I-Go-Kosoku-Tei: What ship is that? (C. C. Cheng)
 
>it's Type 1( I-Go) high speed(kosoku) boat(tei). Well, that's
That's exactly the translation. I have a feeling that it's a torpedo boat because the Japanese Navy, impressed with the effectiveness of US PT boats, built a variety of torpedo boats, none of which really succeeded.
I know someone who may know so I will ask.
 
Posted By: John Videll <jvid33@cbot.com>
Date: Wednesday, 29 December 1999, at 12:34 p.m.
 
Does anyone know where I can obtain model kits of IJN ships? Specifically the Oi in its torpedo-boat on steroids" form? Thank you.
 
Re: IJN Oi model
 
Posted By: Mike Quan <MnkQuan@worldnet.att.net>
Date: Wednesday, 29 December 1999, at 1:41 p.m.
 
In Response To: IJN Oi model (John Videll)
 
The only kits available of the IJNS Oi as a torpedo boat are by Pitroad as a 700th waterline resin kit, and the identically-priced more recent 700th release by Skywave in injected plastic form. IMHO, the Skywave kit is better detailed. They both run around $25-$30. Stateside, try Pacific Front Hobbies in Roseburg Oregon for both kits -- see link below. If ordering from Japan, HobbyLink Japan or Rainbow Ten carry these kits. HTH.
 
Hasegawa's Heian Maru
 
Posted By: V. Tapasanan <tvidya@hotmail.com>
Date: Monday, 27 December 1999, at 10:03 p.m.
 
According to Hasegawa planned new release for 2000, they mention 1/700 Armed Auxillary Cruiser "Heian Maru". Does anybody have information about this particular ship and her war record ?
 
Re: Hasegawa's Heian Maru correction
 
Posted By: V.Tapasanan <tvidya@hotmail.com>
Date: Tuesday, 28 December 1999, at 4:40 a.m.
 
In Response To: Hasegawa's Heian Maru (V. Tapasanan)
 
Correction. Heian Maru was Submarine Tender converted from merchant ship, it was about 10,000 tons and was sunk in Dec. 1944. More information about this ship will be very much welcomed.
 
Re: Hasegawa's Heian Maru diorama
 
Posted By: Mike Quan <MnkQuan@worldnet.att.net>
Date: Tuesday, 28 December 1999, at 11:13 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Hasegawa's Heian Maru correction (V.Tapasanan)
 
As a further follow up to the Heian Maru, a nice diorama of the Hikawa Maru converted to the Heian Maru is featured in the February 2000 issue of Fine Scale Modeler on page 42 of the Reader Gallery feature.
 
Re: Hasegawa's Heian Maru correction
 
Posted By: Mike Quan <MnkQuan@worldnet.att.net>
Date: Tuesday, 28 December 1999, at 7:34 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Hasegawa's Heian Maru correction (V.Tapasanan)
 
As I recall from a very old German modeling magazine, the Heian Maru is a sister ship to the already available Hikawa Maru from Hasegawa, and thus will probably feature only a cursory paint and decal change from the already tooled Hasegawa kit, with the possible exception of the addition of a couple of guns or AA. the German magazine as I recall, had an article for the conversion of the hospital ship to the AS, featureing a rather dazzling, crazy-quilt camoflage pattern. HTH!
 
Re: Hasegawa's Heian Maru correction
 
Posted By: V.Tapasanan <tvidya@hotmail.com>
Date: Tuesday, 28 December 1999, at 3:56 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Hasegawa's Heian Maru correction (Mike Quan)
 
Many thanks. I used to wonder why Hasegawa's going to release 1/700 Heian Maru which was not so 
well-known but I do hope that the camouflage color scheme and weapons added will be worth to take into consideration.
 
Re: Hasegawa's Heian Maru correction
 
Posted By: Dan Kaplan <dboykap@aol.com>
Date: Tuesday, 28 December 1999, at 10:41 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Hasegawa's Heian Maru correction (V.Tapasanan)
 
Actually, Heian Maru and Hikawa Maru were part of a trio of sister passenger liners built for Nippon 
Yusen KK and requisitioned for war service at the outset of the war. The third ship is the Hie Maru, also requisitioned as a submarine tender like the Heian Maru. There's a good article with interpolated camouflage on the Heian Maru by Dan Jones in the 1996/1 issue of Plastic Ship Modeler.
 
Re: Hasegawa's Heian Maru correction
 
Posted By: Dan Kaplan <dboykap@aol.com>
Date: Friday, 4 February 2000, at 10:23 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Hasegawa's Heian Maru correction (V. Tapasanan)
 
Guess what? Hasegawa is apparently releasing a Heian Maru Version this spring. I just received the new 2000 catalog and while there's no version yet shown, there was an annoucement insert with a detailed line profile. The profile shows shielded bow & stern gum mounts, a more diverse assortment of ship's boats, no indication of whether or not there is a camouflage scheme.
The announcement was also posted by HLJ.
 
Re: Hasegawa's Heian Maru correction
 
Posted By: V. Tapasanan <tvidya@hotmail.com>
Date: Friday, 4 February 2000, at 4:06 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Hasegawa's Heian Maru correction (Dan Kaplan)
 
Hasegawa's Heian Maru Submarine Depot ship was just released last week and is now on sale. The ship feature the camouflage scheme like Kimikawa maru Seaplane tender and looks very nice although it is almost the same model of Kikawa maru Hospital ship plus weapons.
 
AO SHIRETOKO
 
Posted By: Ron Wolford <wolfieeod@aol.com>
Date: Tuesday, 21 December 1999, at 10:44 a.m.
 
A couple of years ago I purchased from Pacific Front Hobbies a 1/700 model of the Oilier Shiretoko (A-44) When I received it I noticed that it represent the ship in an unusual configuration. Can any body explain this configuration to me? She has two large above deck hatches with two large tripod
derrecks instead of the usual kingposts. This configuration is shown on page 19 of Kaijinsha Auxiliary Vessels of the Imperial Japanese Navy, but since I don't read Japanese I don't know if it gives any details
 
Re: AO SHIRETOKO
 
Posted By: Dan Kaplan <dboykap@aol.com>
Date: Sunday, 26 December 1999, at 12:14 p.m.
 
In Response To: AO SHIRETOKO (Ron Wolford)
 
I, too, have an as yet unbuilt Shiretoko sitting on the shelf. I'm using Jentschura and the Maru # 34 as references but I can't really shed any light. PP 12-13 in the Maru shows 3 ships of this class, one is cited as Shiretoko. One shot shows only the aft tripod. Three of the other shots shows at least one other vessel with a rear tripod in addition to two masts and kingposts. Strictly a guess, but the different tripod configurations might have been part of the trial fueling rigs for fore-and-aft fueling as opposed to side-by-side fueling that the IJN experimented with. One other thought, the two large tripods and hatches seem more appropriate to a special services transport ship like the Kashino. Maybe there was a conversion? Ithink I will attempt to configure her as more typical of the class.
Question for you: According to the kit diagram, the foredeck looks like wood planking. What about the rest of the decking? Wood? Linoleum? Plating?
 
Re: AO SHIRETOKO
 
Posted By: Ron Wolford <wolfieeod@aol.com>
Date: Tuesday, 4 January 2000, at 4:44 p.m.
 
In Response To: AO SHIRETOKO (Ron Wolford)
 
Sorry this is so late getting back to you. I agree with you that she was a special service transport like the 
Kashino. The picture I have of her in this configuration (National Archives 80-G-216865) says that this photo was captured on Kwajalein in Feb 1944. This plus ONI-208J Rev. (Japanese Merchant Ship Rec Manual) shows her in her tanker fit leads me to believe that this was a war time configuration. Yes I think the foredeck is wood planking also if you want to make the tanker version the foward well deck needs to be extended up to the base of the foward leg of the tripod. As for the rest of the ship both welldecks are steel plating, The raised area around the bridge and the raised area with the lifeboats is wood planking. And the stern steel plating. I hope this help you out if you have any outher questions please let me know.
 
Need a list of secret and experimental IJN ships and subs of WWII
 
Posted By: DANIS Jean-Charles <amar.derni@cfwb.be>
Date: Wednesday, 24 November 1999, at 4:11 a.m.
 
As my primary interest in modelling covers experimental, prototype and secret vehicles (planes,AFVs and ships), does anyone can give me a list of Japanese ships and submarines that can be listed in these categories.
 
Re: Need a list of secret and experimental IJN ships and subs of WWII
 
Posted By: Kevin Pryor <kpryor@mail.millikin.edu>
Date: Monday, 29 November 1999, at 10:29 a.m.
 
In Response To: Need a list of secret and experimental IJN ships and subs of WWII (DANIS Jean-Charles)
 
Going off memory here, there are quite a few "secret" IJN weapons in Japan's arsenal, and they're usually 
a little more unconventional than standard secret weapons.
One of the most obvious examples of a secret weapon was the A-type midget submarine. I believe in Zenji Orita's book "I-Boat Captain," he mentioned how the subs were hidden from regular Japanese officers as boiler tubes or something of that sort. These midgets and their offspring were not very successful (although one nearly sank a Brit BB off Madagascar) but they definitely fall under the jurisdiction of a secret weapon (hidden development, novelty, technical, used in special ops, etc., etc.) If you're looking for a kit, I believe Fine Molds does one of the Type A and the Kaitan in 1/72. You can order it from HLJ, as Fine Molds is really hard to find outside of Japan right now.
Another secret weapon was a semi-submersible tank developed by the Army, that was a complete disaster. It was intended to wade onto U.S. held islands and cause havoc, but the tanks had so many flaws that they were deathtraps.
The IJN's most successful secret weapon was the Type 93 torpedo, the famous "Long Lance". Other navies toyed around with oxygen torpedoes, but only the IJN put the effort in that was necessary to make the Type 93 a viable platform. Again, the Japanese went through elaborate security precautions to hide the weapon's existence, and its performance in the Solomons shocked many U.S. commanders. Although the Type 93 had its own dangers (there was a reason aside from technical problems that other navies didn't adapt the oxygen torpedo), the risk (IMHO) was justified in that it gave IJN cruisers and destroyers an edge that their contemporaries lacked.
Although not necessarily secret, the Yamato superbattleships could fall into this category. The IJN intended that their 18.1 inch guns and heavy armor would be kept as secret as long as possible. When the U.S. responded with similar ships (like the Montanas), the Japanese would have a few years lead in the design and would start the construction of massive 20 inch behemoths while America played catch up.
That's all I could think of at the top of my head for now. I'll look into the Orita book and see if I can find any more details on the mini-subs and the tanks.
 
seaplane tender
 
Posted By: Gary Majchrzak <GAMAKACH@MR.NET>
Date: Thursday, 10 June 1999, at 8:09 p.m.
 
Could someone direct me to or supply me with the a photo of the crane or other device used to recover japanese seaplanes (Jake & Glen) from the water. Even a basic line drawing would be of assistance.
 
Re: seaplane tender
 
Posted By: Ryan Toews <ritoews@mb.sympatico.ca>
Date: Saturday, 19 June 1999, at 8:59 a.m.
 
In Response To: seaplane tender (Gary Majchrzak)
 
The cranes used on Japanese ships were not standardized. Each class of ship used different patterns of 
cranes and these patterns could change over time as a ship underwent refitting. However, if you have a specific ship in mind it should be possible to provide details on the crane it used.
 
Posted By: Gary Majchrzak <gamakach@mr.net>
Date: Saturday, 19 June 1999, at 4:37 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: seaplane tender (Ryan Toews)
 
Thanks for your answer. My interest in the crane system is specific. I'd like to see any type that that was 
used to retrieve the "Jake" or "Glen" from the water. I already have the launch rail from which these planes were jettisoned.
Also of interest would be photos of the immediate area (deck), where these systems were and what they looked like.
If you haven't guessed, I am planning a diorama of the above. Mr. Aiken was very helpful in sending me some crane info. But I would appreciate anything anyone has that they feel would help me in my cause.
I have noticed an increase in interest in japanese/Pacific
 
Re: seaplane tender/cranes
 
Posted By: Gary Majchrzak <gamakach@mr.net>
Date: Saturday, 19 June 1999, at 4:44 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: seaplane tender/cranes (Gary Majchrzak)
 
Hit the wrong key. As I meant to finish, I've seen the increase in interest in the Japanese/Pacific WWII period in the modelling market. I can see why. There is a panorama of subjects yet to be explored by modelers who are tired of Tiger tanks and Folke-Wulfs. The manufacturer(s) who jumps on this market will be i demand.
What do you think?
 
Re: seaplane tender/cranes
 
Posted By: Ryan Toews <ritoews@mb.sympatico.ca>
Date: Monday, 21 June 1999, at 7:32 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: seaplane tender/cranes (Gary Majchrzak)
 
I hope you are right about an increase in Japanese subjects but I expect that the European Theatre will always continue to hold the majority's interest in WWII.
I will try to expand a bit on seeing if I have anything that may be of help to you. I have next to no information on the recovery devices used for operations with the "Glen". This aircraft was, as far as I know, used only on submarines, a subject which so far is absent from my library.
The "Jake" was used on a varity of vessels, including battleships, cruisers, and seaplane tenders. Thus far my interest lies primarily with cruisers; however, if you are looking for information on the aircraft launch and recovery systems for a particular class or ship of this size let me know and I'll be glad to see what I can find on my shelves.
 
Re: seaplane tender/cranes
 
Posted By: Gary Majchrzak <gamakach@mr.net>
Date: Monday, 21 June 1999, at 1:38 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: seaplane tender/cranes (Ryan Toews)
 
Thank you for your generous offer to help. Since Japanese ships is not my strong suit I wholly accept your bid to assist.
I would like to view a launch rail and recovery crane from both a Cruiser and a Tender. If whatever you can find shows a bit of the nearby deck or even superstructure, I will likely include it in my model. General detail is fine as I will build this in 1/72 scale which is too small to sweat the little stuff.
If you come up with something and want to send it directly to me that would be fine. I don't know if the folks here would want it clogging up their site.
 
Green Cross
 
Posted By: Tom Hall <hall41@ix.netcom.com>
Date: Friday, 19 March 1999, at 5:36 a.m.
 
Can someone please tell me and Ms. Baacke whether a Japanese hospital
ship would have had green crosses painted on the sides? Or were they
red crosses? What is shown on the Hikawa Maru kit box? Is that accurate?
 
Re: Green Cross
 
Posted By: Tennessee Katsuta <kinson-garments@on.aibn.com>
Date: Friday, 19 March 1999, at 1:24 p.m.
 
In Response To: Green Cross (Tom Hall)
 
According to Model Art No.505"1/700 Scale Model Japanese War Ships Hand Book", Hikawamaru as a hospital ship had RED crosses, not green. Apparently the box art is accurate with the ship painted white with green stripe on the sides. There were two red crosses each on both sides of the ship, one on the front of the bridge, and one on both sides of the funnel. Behind the funnel, there was a red cross made from a large red neon light!
Early in her career as a hospital ship, Hikawamaru had only one red cross each on both side of the hull, instead of two each.
I hope this helps.
 
Re: Green Cross
 
Posted By: Tom Hall <hall41@ix.netcom.com>
Date: Friday, 19 March 1999, at 4:33 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Green Cross (Tennessee Katsuta)
 
Yes, it helps a lot. Thank you.
Let me ask a question that may take us beyond modeling guides:
Is there any possibility that Japan traded the red cross for a green
cross during the war years? Wasn't there a danger of confusion of
the red cross on a white field with a hinomaru on a white field,
especially at a distance?
 
Posted By: Franois P. WEILL <frpawe@wanadoo.fr>
Date: Friday, 19 March 1999, at 6:11 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Green Cross (Tom Hall)
 
I don't think there is any chance.
 
International conventions were supposed to give immunity to ships (and other equipement) bearing a red cross... Not so for a green one.
 
23 december 1941
 
Posted By: Jasper Versteeg <jasper.versteeg@student.utwente.nl>
Date: Tuesday, 16 March 1999, at 7:49 a.m.
 
I would like to know more about the following ships:
Japanese troopship SS Katori Maru (9848t)
Japanese troopship SS Hiyoshi Maru (4943t)
these ships were sunk at 23 december 1941 by the Dutch submarine K-XIV which
in the same attack also damaged the following ships:
Japanese troopship MS Hokkai Maru (8416t)
Japanese troopship SS Nichiran Maru (6503t) (or Ninchinan Maru)
further on the submarinetreid to attack a Japanese freighter and a destroyer
these attacks were without results.
If anyone has some info about these ships it would be welcome. Names could
be written wrong.
One warning I am not a ship builder but an airplane builder who took a little
side road and is now planning to build the K-XIV in 1/72.
 
Re: 23 december 1941
 
Posted By: Ryan Toews <ritoews@mb.sympatico.ca>
Date: Wednesday, 24 March 1999, at 12:52 p.m.
 
In Response To: 23 december 1941 (Jasper Versteeg)
 
In The Imperial Japanese Navy (1941-1945), page 42, Paul Dull briefly mentions the attack of 23 December as follows, "Since 15 December, the Japanese forces had been subject to sporadic air and submarine attacks. Further losses were incurred when the destroyer Sagiri, on 24 December, was torpedoed twice and sunk, with 121 men killed, by the Dutch submarine K-XVI. At Kuching one transport was sunk by planes, and one by the K-XVI. Three transports were also damaged by the K-XIV." Unfortunately I cannot find any more details on these transports.
As I understand it, SS means steam ship and MS means motor ship (ie. diesel). MV, or motor vessel, is sometimes used instead of MS.
 
Re: 23 december 1941
 
Posted By: Jasper Versteeg <jasper.versteeg@student.utwente.nl>
Date: Wednesday, 24 March 1999, at 1:19 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: 23 december 1941 (Ryan Toews)
 
Thanks for the reply. But I mentioned the K-XIV and you mentioned the K-XVI
these are two different ships as a mather of fact the K-XVI was sunk by the Japanese submarine I-66 just a day afther this attack whil the K-XIV survived
the war.
Thanks for the explaning of MS and SS. But do you know anything about the Japanese names? What means Maru? Ship?
 
Re: 23 december 1941
 
Posted By: Graham Boak <graham@boak98.freestyle.co.uk>
Date: Thursday, 25 March 1999, at 11:18 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: 23 december 1941 (Jasper Versteeg)
 
I understand that Maru is applied as a suffix to all commercial ships (including a number of auxiliary warships based on civil hulls) and an approximate translation is "tubby" i.e. fat, stemming from their shape compared with the slender design of warships. But I'm not expert in Japanese.
 
Re: 23 december 1941
 
Posted By: Tennessee Katsuta <kinson-garments@on.aibn.com>
Date: Thursday, 25 March 1999, at 7:01 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: 23 december 1941 (Graham Boak)
 
Graham is absolutely correct about "maru" being used as a suffix to commercial ships. The direct translation of "maru" is "circle". I do not know why it's use is limited only to commercial ships(although if memory serves correctly, I believe early Japanese warships from late 1800's often had the suffix "maru").
I looked up "maru" in a Japanese dictionary, and it stated that "maru" was often used as a suffix for names of persons, swords, art work, ships, and even pet dogs. It also explaned that the word maru, when used as suffix, was derived from an old Japanese word(we're talking about about 1000 years ago),"maro." "Maro " was often used as a suffix to a male name. It didn't say how the usage of "maru" to represent a ship's name came about.
I deduce that the meaning of the word "maru(which is "cicle")" has very little to do with its use in a ship's name. After all, it's also used to name swords, which are far from being circular or round.
Are there any linguists out there who can explain how they came about using "maru" to represent ships?
 
Re: 23 december 1941
 
Posted By: Ryan Toews
Date: Thursday, 25 March 1999, at 4:05 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: 23 december 1941 (Jasper Versteeg)
 
The K-XIV was the sub that was said to have damaged the 3 tranports. I am not able to say what the ships' names translate as but I believe that Maru means ship.
 
Re: 23 december 1941
 
Posted By: Jasper Versteeg <jasper.versteeg@student.utwente.nl>
Date: Thursday, 25 March 1999, at 8:46 a.m.
 
In Response To: Re: 23 december 1941 (Ryan Toews)
 
Sorry I aperaintly read the message not completly right, due to the language
problem I guess. Thanks for your reply.
 
Re: 23 december 1941
 
Posted By: Jasper Versteeg <jasper.versteeg@student.utwente.nl>
Date: Saturday, 20 March 1999, at 8:08 a.m.
 
In Response To: 23 december 1941 (Jasper Versteeg)
 
Sorry everyone,
But I'm still looking for info on the Japanese ships meantioned in my firstmail on this messageboard. Certainly I would like to know what it is:
SS Nichiran Maruor or SS Ninchinan Maru. Further on is there a translation possible of these names and what means SS or MS?
 
Re: Japanese names
 
Posted By: Roland Mar <tsuma@rmi.net>
Date: Friday, 2 April 1999, at 7:00 p.m.
 
In Response To: Japanese names (Jasper Versteeg)
 
I hope I am not intruding, as I just blundered into this website, but in answer to your questions: S.S. means "Steam Ship" and M.S. means "Motor Ship". The latter means the ship is diesel powered. I hope this helps.
 
Re: Japanese names
 
Posted By: Randy <r.stone.eal@juno.com>
Date: Tuesday, 30 May 2000, at 6:12 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Japanese names (Roland Mar)
 
Anyone who 'blunders' into a website, as I have, such as this is to be welcomed. Any-way, your definition 
of MS versus SS is dead on and it helps those of us not
so enlightended.
 
Japanese landing crafts of WWII
 
Posted By: Ulrich Schulte-Ebbert <kingfischer@thepentagon.com>
Date: Friday, 26 February 1999, at 9:53 a.m.
 
does anyone know where I can find photos and scale plans of Japanese landing crafts of WWII. I like to construct 1:100 scale models of them.
 
Re: Japanese landing crafts of WWII
 
Posted By: Ron Perry <ron@perry.nl>
Date: Tuesday, 9 March 1999, at 3:12 a.m.
 
In Response To: Japanese landing crafts of WWII (Ulrich Schulte-Ebbert)
 
There is a book 'ASSAULT from the SEA' dy J.D.Ladd containing 12 pages on Japanese landing craft with 1 picture of 'Landing Ship Class I' and one of the
'Landing ship no. T149 , but no drawings.
I can make you a copy if you like .
 
Re: Japanese landing crafts of WWII
 
Posted By: Paul <pesnbrg@marin.k12.ca.us>
Date: Monday, 15 March 1999, at 8:20 p.m.
 
In Response To: Re: Japanese landing crafts of WWII (Ulrich Schulte-Ebbert)
 
The Special fast landing ships of the Imperial Japanese Navy,Parts 1 and 2, Hans Lengerer, Sumie Kobler-Edamatsu and Tomoko Rehm-Takahara, appeares in Warship, Vol X,Conway Maritime Press Ltd, 1986. This was published in the U.S. by the Naval Institute Press.
I don't know if it is still in print, but if you can get this volume, the article includes some photos and basic plan views that might be of some help. Unfortunately there is not adequate information for an accurate model in 1:100 scale.
P.S. I would be interested in doing this project also. If you find a good source for 1:100 scale plans, let me know - Thanks
 
Skywave IJNS Oi question
 
Posted By: Mike Quan <MnkQuan@worldnet.att.net>
Date: Wednesday, 27 January 1999, at 6:20 p.m.
 
Hello all! The new Skywave kit of the Oi has posed a new twist to the IJN torpedo cruiser paradigm. All 
sources on the IJNS torpedo cruiser Oi show the ten quad torpedo tube mounts as being shielded. The only exception is the illustration in Jentschura, Mickel, & Jung's IJN Warships - 1896-1945, which shows unshielded torpedo tubes which is what is provided in the kit. Strangely, the Skywave instructions say:
"According to recent theory, the TT mounts were not shielded as molded in the kit. However, Mr. Tatsu Abe, who was a "Kitakami" crew, advised that they were. If you prefer his theory, please use No. 20 parts of E-10 Equipment for Japan Navy Ship WW2 V (4 in 1 box)."
Can anyone out there expand on Skywave's contention of "recent theory"? Thanks.
 
Re: Skywave IJNS Oi question
 
Posted By: Lars Ahlberg <lars.ahlberg@halmstad.mail.postnet.se>
Date: Friday, 12 February 1999, at 5:09 a.m.
 
In Response To: Skywave IJNS Oi question (Mike Quan)
 
The theory of "not shielded" torpedo mounts is completely new to me and I cannot find anything that supports this "recent theory". I have only consulted a few sources (see below) but they are all in agreement: The "Kitakami" and "i" were both equipped with ten quadruple Type 92 Model 3 mounts (shielded).
* Hans Lengerer, Sumie Kobler-Edamatsu & Tomoto Rehm-Takahara, "Warship" #37, "Kitakami".
* Eric Lacroix & Linton Wells II, "Japanese Cruisers of the Pacific War".
* Mori Tsunehide, "Gunkan Mekanizumu Zukan: Nihon no Jun-ykan".
* "The Maru Special: Japanese Naval Vessels" #46.

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